Racism for kids 101 part 2

Over the Christmas period, many families were together enjoying the festive season and the opportunity to spend time together at a special time of the year. One particular family celebrated their Christmas with a twist – see the video below.

When I first saw the video I was confused and had to watch the video again as I didn’t understand what was going on. She’d just received a doll, so what was all the fuss about?

Essentially, the parents of this young girl intentionally bought a black doll for their daughter as a prank and decided to film her reaction, and then post it up on twitter. You really can’t make this stuff up! Who would have thought receiving a black doll as a gift would cause such a reaction?

The young girl tears open the gift excitedly, realises that the gift is a black doll, screams loudly, starts crying, throws the doll across the living room, her parents are cackling in the background saying ‘look at that it’s black’ and she continues to cry harder.

The parents clearly knew what they were doing and weren’t surprised by their daughters reaction at all, in fact they found it absolutely hilarious.

Like I touched on earlier, the first time I watched the video I was confused. I didn’t understand why the young girl was crying and why her parents were laughing, then it clicked, receiving the black doll was the butt of the joke. Her parents have ingrained prejudiced and racist views into her about black people, and they knew buying her a black doll would upset her, which is why they decided to film her opening the gift. As much as the parents are to blame for this, it’s extremely concerning that this young girl screamed, threw the doll with such disgust and was crying like something awful had happened. But I guess from her perspective due to the terrible influences she’s had from her parents, receiving a black doll as a gift is awful. Racism is a learned behaviour, I don’t believe anyone is born racist.

Watching the video made it really hit home that the young generation that will be the leaders of the future need positive guidance and influences. Children are extremely impressionable and I shudder to think what exactly that young girl has been taught by her parents (and other ‘role models’ around her) to make her react so negatively to receiving a black doll. What have they told her? Have they warned her about ‘rough’ black people? Have they used racial slurs in her presence? Have they told her to ‘be careful’ around black students in her class?

The earlier the racism and prejudice starts, the larger it grows and the more difficult it is to tackle. Is this young girl already avoiding fellow black students at schools, is she scared of black people, does she use racial slurs, does she refuse to interact with black people? The video clip ended fairly abruptly, but I wonder what happened to that beautiful black doll, most likely it was thrown into the bin, the parents soothed her and then may have replaced the doll with a more ‘suitable alternative’.

Seeing videos like this shows in black and white (excuse the pun) that racism still does exist and it’s not just the older generation that grew up in different times with old fashioned views, it’s also young children growing up in these modern times. We’re in 2020 for goodness sake, and a young girl is throwing a black doll away and crying dramatically, rather than being grateful she even received a gift for Christmas! To top it off, her parents think this is so funny and actually posted such an embarrassing video of their daughter on social media. How low can you go?

Children are innately innocent and loving, however if they aren’t properly taught decent morals and values, the domino effect of racism will continue to flip over and over into future generations.

The video received swift backlash and ‘Molly Boyle’ who had originally posted the video (presumably the mother) deleted her twitter account. Seeing the backlash the video received is encouraging as it shows most people don’t hold the same views, but we still need to go one step further, we need to continue to educate and protect young children, otherwise we’re at risk of discussing the exact same issues in 50 or so years time.

Lola I

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